In the news / Bioimaging

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Dr. Jennifer Kehlet Barton, director of the UArizona BIO5 Institute, has been elected to serve as the 2022 Vice President of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. With her election, Dr. Barton will serve as President-Elect in 2023 and as the Society's President in 2024.
 
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Biomedical engineering student Sebastian (Sebo) Diaz is among 55 students from 42 colleges and universities who have been selected as 2021 Udall Scholars, on the basis of commitment to careers in the environment, Tribal public policy, or Native health care; leadership potential; record of public service; and academic achievement.
 
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The University of Arizona Health Sciences Career Development Awards (CDA) program recently selected Dr. David Tzou, as one of its four 2021 recipients. Mentored by BIO5 member Dr. Gayatri Vedantam, Dr. Tzou’s research focuses on minimizing radiation in kidney stone patients and using ultrasound to guide surgeries for kidney stones and enlarged prostates.
 
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An exploration of new techniques can bring past states to life to solve our current, and future, most pressing problems. Dr. Betül Kaçar discusses how evolutionary biology and "failed" species studied under paleobiology, can relate to discoveries using bioengineering and biology-based solutions.
 
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Millions are being vaccinated for COVID-19, but some researchers are looking for new ways to detect it. University of Arizona scientist and BIO5 member Dr. Judith Su, is searching for a method to find the disease at the molecular level. If successful, the coronavirus could be detected through sensors that can deliver results within a minute.
 
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Harnessing the power of technology, the BIO5 Institute will virtually connect University of Arizona faculty and researchers with representatives from biotech, biomedical, and life science companies at the FINE event on Thursday, August 13, 2020.
 
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UArizona Mel & Enid College of Public Health researchers including BIO5 member Dr. Leslie Farland, will lead an NIH funded research study that investigates the association between endometriosis, infertility, and stroke burden in women. Endometriosis is a chronic gynecology disease experienced by approximately 10% of all women. It occurs when endometrial-like tissue, which is usually found lining the walls of the uterus, is located outside the uterus and is characterized by increased levels of inflammation and aberrant immune function. It can be incredibly painful, causing loss of productivity and infertility.
 
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New research led by researchers from the BIO5 Institute’s Center for Insect Science shows that crustaceans such as shrimps, lobsters, and crabs, have more in common with their insect relatives than previously thought when it comes to the structure of their brains. Both insects and crustaceans possess mushroom-shaped brain structures known in insects to be required for learning, memory and possibly negotiating complex, three-dimensional environments.
 
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BIO5 director and UArizona Biomedical Engineering professor Dr. Jennifer Barton recently spoke with SPIE - the international society for optics and photonics, where she serves at the co-chair for their BiOS program. During their conversation, Dr. Barton gave a conceptual tour of the labs of Drs. Clara Curiel, Philipp Gutruf, D.K. Kang, and Judy Su, and discussed how their research is impacting bioscience fields.
 
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A team of researchers, including UArizona Biomedical Engineering professor and BIO5 member Dr. Philipp Gutruf, have developed a device that could provide unique insight into the mechanisms of pain, depression, addiction and certain diseases. The ultra-small, wireless, battery-free device uses light to record individual neurons so neuroscientists can see how the brain is working.
 
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New UArizona research, led by Department of MCB associate professor and BIO5 faculty Dr. Nancy Horton, has revealed the structure and function of one of bacteria’s latest strategies in the fight against viruses. The findings are part of Dr. Horton's larger research interest in the existence of filament-forming enzymes. Filaments had been largely forgotten to science until 2010, when a handful of labs around the world began investigating them using newer, higher resolution electron microscopes.
 
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UArizona Biomedical Engineering professor and director of the BIO5 Institute Dr. Jennifer Barton, gives a look into a day in her life. Dr. Barton discusses her academic and professional journey, how and why she began conducting her current research, and the importance of women becoming increasingly involved in engineering and STEM fields.
 
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With funds from the National Institute of Health, Dr. Nathan Cherrington, UArizona College of Pharmacy Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies and BIO5 member, has created a non-invasive diagnostic to determine if someone has Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is a chronic liver disease that irregulates the function of the liver and affects an estimated 30 to 50 million patients, with only around 300,000 of them being properly diagnosed. Currently, the only diagnosis for NASH includes a painful liver biopsy, which can result in heavy blood loss.
 
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Dr. Jennifer Barton, University of Arizona professor of biomedical engineering and director of the BIO5 Institute, has been appointed to the National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. The council advises the leadership of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, or NIBIB, on policies and priorities related to research, training and health information dissemination in the areas of biomedical imaging and engineering.
 
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With the support of a new $3.8 million grant from the National Institute on Aging, a team of researchers, led by UA Department of Psychology professor and BIO5 member Dr. Gene Alexander, will investigate whether near-infrared light could help enhance cognition and reduce Alzheimer's disease risk in older adults. Dr. Ted Trouard, a BIO5 member and UA Biomedical Engineering professor, will serve as a co-investigator on the project.
 
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By using $2.1 million in funding from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a UArizona team of researchers led by Biomedical Engineering associate professor and BIO5 member Dr. Nan-kuei Chen, is looking to develop faster MR technologies to accommodate challenging patient populations. The research aims to provide higher-resolution images with richer information, giving health care practitioners more information about the stage of a disease and the ability to detect brain signal abnormality for those afflicted with diseases like Parkinson's.
 
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A team led by University of Arizona Biomedical Engineering professor and BIO5 researcher, Dr. Jeong-Yeol Yoon, has created a highly sensitive portable detection system capable of spotting norovirus at levels that can make people sick. Dr. Yoon believes that the handheld detection system could be used by governmental officials to analyze local groundwater sources in areas with heavy septic tank usage or even on cruise ships, where the virus is prevalent. 
 
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To better understand biological processes, a UA research team that includes BIO5 faculty member and Chemistry & Biochemistry professor Dr. Craig Aspinwall, has developed new materials for detecting radioisotopes that provide faster and higher resolution results than today’s generally accepted methods. The new technology provides new resolution in radioisotope detection, and offers a more environmentally sound alternative by reducing the hazardous chemical usage and waste that existed in previous methods.