In the news / Diabetes

NEWS
Medical researchers who connect diabetes with obesity think the liver plays a key role. University of Arizona biomedical scientist Ben Renquist is measuring neurotransmitters produced by the liver that can cause blood sugar levels to become unstable.
 
NEWS
Despite slowdowns in research suffered by universities around the world due to the pandemic, the University of Arizona has experienced solid growth in the commercialization of university inventions. In the last fiscal year alone UArizona received 274 invention disclosures and launched 17 startups.
 
NEWS
Despite slowdowns in research suffered by universities around the world due to the pandemic, the University of Arizona has experienced solid growth in the commercialization of university inventions.
 
NEWS
A University of Arizona study on Type 2 diabetes could completely alter the way the disease is treated by fighting it a different way. Scientists’ findings indicate the disease could be fought at its source: the way the liver communicates with the rest of the body. Dr. Benjamin Renquist principal investigator for this study, essentially stumbled upon the discovery by while conducting a study to determine a correlation between hunger and fat buildup in the liver. The key to these new findings is a neurotransmitter — a signal in the body that sends information to the brain — produced in the liver and known as GABA, short for gamma aminobutyric acid.
 
NEWS
Working to prevent Type 2 diabetes, researchers at the University of Arizona are collaborating with scientists universities around the nation to study the connection between fatty liver, the brain, and metabolic disease.
 
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The Department of Physiology in the College of Medicine - Tucson announces the appointments of Dr. Claudia Stanescu, as associate department head for education, and Dr. Erika Eggers, as associate department head for research. Dr. Eggers, associate professor in the Department of Physiology and the Department of Biomedical Engineering and BIO5 member, leads an active research group that studies synaptic physiology in the retina and the defects that develop in early diabetes.
 
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder that affects an estimated 5.8 million Americans, disproportionately affects women. The Women's Alzheimer's Movement (WAM), a nonprofit founded by Maria Shriver, is at the forefront in taking action to help find solutions to the disease. $500,000 in grant funding for women-based Alzheimer’s disease research to many researchers including Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, University of Arizona Center for Innovation in Brain Science director and BIO5 member, who is using her grant to study Type 2 diabetes therapies and associated risks of Alzheimer’s in women.
 
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Dr. Donna Zhang, associate director of the UArizona Superfund Research Center and BIO5 member, has been awarded an eight-year, $7.3 million federal grant to advance her research. Dr. Zhang will use the grant to continue her two-decades of research to determine how a family of proteins can be harnessed to prevent or treat arsenic-induced lung cancer and Type 2 diabetes.
 
NEWS
Researchers working with the UArizona Superfund Research Center, including BIO5 members Drs. A. Jay Gandolfi, Raina Maier, and Donna Zhang, will explore the link between chronic exposure to arsenic and the development of diabetes, thanks to a $10.6 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.
 
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The BIO5 Institute solicited COVID-19 research proposals for seed grants supplied by the Technology and Research Initiative Fund (TRIF).

 
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As of April 28, more than 6,500 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the state of Arizona.

 
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UArizona Pharmacology and Toxicology professor and BIO5 faculty Dr. Donna Zhang, leads her lab to examine how chronic exposure to arsenic causes genetic changes linked to disease development. By using QIAGEN Genomic Services, the team discovered that arsenic and high-fat diets induce similar transcriptomic changes. Through this analysis, the team also found that when a set of master regulator RNA molecules had been inactivated, there were fewer arsenic-induced dietary changes.
 
NEWS
‘It’s just like a tea bag,’ said lead researcher Dr. Klearchos Papas. ‘The tea leaves [i.e. the islet cells] stay inside, but tea [insulin] comes out.’ Papas is a lead researcher testing a "teabag" device to treat diabetes.
 
NEWS

Lead by The BIO5 Institute's Dr. Klearchos Papap, a group of University of Arizona researchers have borrowed an idea from a teabag -- to develop a better way to keep diabetics, especially children with Type 1 diabetes, healthy.

 
NEWS
A team of researchers, including Dr. Philipp Gutruf, BIO5 member and Assistant Professor in the UA Biomedical Engineering Department, have developed an implantable device that can measure oxygen levels in a living animal, which has potential to pave a new avenue for research into physiological and pathological processes.
 
NEWS
A new implantable "teabag" could help children with Type 1 Diabetes. BIO5 member Dr. Klearchos Papas, Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Medical Imaging at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson, and his team have engineered an innovative new biomedical device that could deliver all the benefits of a transplant to resolve diabetes without drawbacks of anti-rejection drugs.
 
NEWS

Children with Type 1 diabetes have only one option to control their blood sugar: insulin treatment, but insulin shots, pens and pumps fail to perfectly manage blood sugar. Dr.

 
NEWS
The UA received a $1.1 million grant to study the biology underlying the connection between type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. BIO5 member Dr. Yann Klimentidis is a lead researcher on the study, which will utilize publicly available health and genetic information from databases across the world, covering at least 650,000 people.