In the news / Infectious Disease

NEWS
The BIO5 Media Facility has supplied UArizona researchers with top-of-the-line reagents, dishwashing and project support for nearly 15 years.
 
NEWS
Twenty-five years ago, valley fever was an obscure fungal disease from the southwestern U.S. few people understood. But Dr. John Galgiani, knew the severe health consequences of this largely respiratory infection and took that knowledge to the Arizona Board of Regents, which authorized the creation of the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence. Ingrained in the center's mission is outreach and education, and Dr. Galgiani, who also serves as medical director for the Banner – University Medicine Valley Fever Program in Tucson and Phoenix, education includes developing clinical guidelines for clinicians on how to recognize the disease, test for it and treat it.
 
NEWS
Experts say cases of Valley fever, a fungal infection common in the desert Southwest, are on the rise. "For every case, it's reported there are probably three or four people who got sick and had an illness from this but the doctors never recognize it," said Dr. John Galgiani, director of the University of Arizona's Valley Fever Center for Excellence.
 
NEWS
Dr. Michael Johnson discusses his passion for mentoring and outreach, and how being on the receiving end of this support has helped his professional growth.
 
NEWS
Dr. John Galgiani, a professor of medicine in infectious diseases at the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is hopeful that a Valley fever vaccine for dogs may lay the groundwork for another human candidate.
 
NEWS
Wondering how much protection you have against COVID-19? There are antibody, or serology, tests that will tell you if your body mounted an immune response.
 
NEWS
To discuss the ways to tackle the spread of the second wave of COVID-19 in rural areas of India, the Centre for Habitat, Urban and Regional Studies (CHURS) and Impact and Policy Research Institute (IMPRI), New Delhi organized a panel discussion on “Rural Realities | Karnataka Practitioners’ Experiences in Tackling the Second Wave.” The esteemed panelists included Dr. Purnima Madhivanan, BIO5 member and UArizona associate professor with the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. Along with her colleagues, Dr. Madhivanan discussed issues including the challenges of vaccine shortage, access to technology, and the role of government in providing sustained public health policy.
 
NEWS
Dr. Michael Johnson, faculty with the UArizona College of Medicine-Tucson, BIO5 Institute, and assistant professor in the Department of Immunobiology, has been named one of 1,000 Inspiring Black Scientists in America by Cell Mentor, an online resource from Cell Press and Cell Signaling Technology that provides early-career researchers with career insights, publishing advice, and techniques on experimental processes and procedures. His work involves investigating how bacteria interact with metals during infections. Also passionate about science communication and community outreach, Dr. Johnson is cofounder of the National Summer Undergraduate Research Project.
 
NEWS
Single-subject genomic methods hold the key to understanding disease origins, assess patient vulnerability and predict treatment outcomes.
 
NEWS
Three teenagers—two soldiers and a civilian—were among the 50 million or more estimated casualties of the 1918 influenza A pandemic. The lungs of the three were saved, preserved in formalin for more than one hundred years, and are now being used to study the virus. Obtaining samples for the study is hard, and the team including Dr. Michael Worobey, UArizona evolutionary biologist and associate director of the BIO5 Institute, was able to secure a total of 13 lung tissue samples from people who died between 1900 and 1931. From specimens that were being housed in the Berlin Museum of Medical History and the pathology collection of the Natural History Museum in Vienna; three of them, all from 1918, contained influenza RNA. These organs are providing genetic clues as to why this flu virus took so many lives.
 
NEWS
Because of two concerning mutations, the variant from India has been given a scary nickname “double mutant,” an incorrect term that is “completely unhelpful,” says Dr. Deepta Bhattacharya, associate professor of immunobiology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. In fact, all the identified variants of concern — including the B.1.1.7 from the U.K., the B.1.351 from South Africa and the P.1 from Brazil — possess one or more mutations, he says.
 
NEWS
As cases drop, pings should too, said Joanna Masel, who helped pilot the Covid app Arizona uses. It’s “good to live in a world,” she said, with fewer notifications -- and fewer cases.
 
NEWS
Seven graduating University of Arizona seniors will be honored for their extraordinary accomplishments during a series of graduation ceremonies to celebrate the class of 2021. Nominated by faculty and peers, this year's seven student award winners were selected based on their integrity, notable achievements and positive contributions to their families and communities. Among these honorees are Alyssa Jean Peterson, Akshay Nathan, and Daniel Weiland, successful undergraduate researchers in the labs of BIO5 faculty, and all planning to continue their studies in STEM.
 
NEWS
On World Asthma Day, we applaud the innovative and translational lung research conducted by our BIO5 Institute members.
 
NEWS
Millions are being vaccinated for COVID-19, but some researchers are looking for new ways to detect it. University of Arizona scientist and BIO5 member Dr. Judith Su, is searching for a method to find the disease at the molecular level. If successful, the coronavirus could be detected through sensors that can deliver results within a minute.
 
NEWS
Emily Merritt, who is pursuing a doctorate in immunobiology, was one of the first students to participate in the Infection and Inflammation as Drivers of Aging, a program funded by a National Institutes of Health T32 training grant, which supports four graduate or post-doctoral students annually. She and four other students presented their research virtually at the inaugural Infection and Inflammation as Drivers of Aging symposium in January. The research topics ranged from chronic inflammatory response to ischemic stroke and tracking antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in aging individuals. Merritt presented on Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite she studies under the guidance of Dr. Anita Koshy, professor of neurology and BIO5 member.
 
NEWS
On April 19, Dr. Floyd “Ski” Chilton discussed differences in COVID-19 disease severity as part of the Precision Wellness in the Time of COVID-19 series.
 
NEWS
Dr. Yves Lussier discusses the fusion of of technology and bioinformatics in precision medicine.