In the news / Genomics

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Nearly one quarter of the global disease burden is attributed to the elderly - a group expected to more than double by 2050. 

 
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A recent UArizona College of Pharmacy study suggests that personal genomic educational testing (PGET), which is thought to have potential as a learning tool in pharmacogenomic education, may offer no significant benefits in terms of improved knowledge or attitudes for PharmD students towards the subject.
 
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Dr. Eric Lyons is stepping up as CyVerse principal investigator and project leader, having worked with the project since 2010 and has served as co-principal investigator since 2012. Dr. Lyons succeeds Dr. Parker Antin who joined the project in 2013, following renewal of its 5-year, $50M NSF award.
 
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The 2021 KEYS research program provided 50 students with a remote summer internship focused on science literacy and data science.
 
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Part of a multi-university collaboration, UArizona has received a nearly $1 million USDA grant to expand the Agricultural Genome to Phenome Initiative. They aim to increase understanding of how genetic code affects physical and behavioral traits in crops and livestock and standardize the collection of phenomic information.
 
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Three teenagers—two soldiers and a civilian—were among the 50 million or more estimated casualties of the 1918 influenza A pandemic. The lungs of the three were saved, preserved in formalin for more than one hundred years, and are now being used to study the virus. Obtaining samples for the study is hard, and the team including Dr. Michael Worobey, UArizona evolutionary biologist and associate director of the BIO5 Institute, was able to secure a total of 13 lung tissue samples from people who died between 1900 and 1931. From specimens that were being housed in the Berlin Museum of Medical History and the pathology collection of the Natural History Museum in Vienna; three of them, all from 1918, contained influenza RNA. These organs are providing genetic clues as to why this flu virus took so many lives.
 
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Dr. Michael Worobey, head of UArizona Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and BIO5 associate director shares how there was a perfect storm of circumstances that led to the current pandemic. According to new information, if there were very small changes in the beginning, the pandemic as we know it now, may not have spread.
 
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UArizona research experts weigh in on what we didn’t know and what we've since learned upon COVID-19 taking hold of the US last spring. Our scientists speak to how the nature of the virus, mitigation strategies, and human behavior continue to shape the path of this pandemic.
 
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The new variant to COVID-19 sports an unusual number of mutations, including some that appear to change the virus’ behavior. It seems to be significantly more transmissible, increasing the rate at which infected people infect others, although there is no evidence to date that the variant triggers more severe disease. There are efforts afoot to try to figure out how widely the new variant is spreading — one of them led by the lab of Dr. Michael Worobey, whose team is develop a test for variant viruses in wastewater from community sewage systems.
 
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Dr. Bruce Walsh received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2020 International Congress in Quantitative Genetics in honor of his foundational textbooks, teaching, and outreach efforts.
 
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Drs. Laura Meredith and Jana U’Ren pivoted their scheduled field work trip to Alaska to infer the impact of terrestrial carbon loss on climate change.
 
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The NASA Astrobiology Program has selected eight new interdisciplinary research teams to inaugurate its Interdisciplinary Consortia for Astrobiology Research program, including two teams at the University of Arizona. One team led by Dr. Betül Kaçar, Molecular and Cellular Biology assistant professor and BIO5 member, was selected from a pool of more than 40 proposals. The breadth and depth of the research of these teams spans the spectrum of astrobiology research, from cosmic origins to planetary system formation, origins and evolution of life, and the search for life beyond Earth.
 
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Sinus infections are one of the most common illnesses, so identifying the progression of the common cold to chronic disease lasting longer than 12 weeks is critical in creating therapies that slow the development of a disease affecting nearly 12% of U.S. adults each year. A group lead by Dr. Eugene Chang, vice chair and associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the UArizona College of Medicine, was awarded $2.24 million to study a protein in the respiratory tract with a genetic variation strongly associated with these ailments.
 
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Dr. Martha Bhattacharya, a UArizona assistant professor of neuroscience and BIO5 member, discusses her research, her career, and her mentor-ship philosophies with the Daily Wildcat. Dr. Bhattacharya's lab recently linked a gene involved in neurodegeneration to the itch sensation that many mammals experience and has drawn interest from the agribusiness industry for her lab's discovery. In future studies, Dr. Bhattacharya hopes to characterize the role of this gene in our understanding of these itch-sensing pathways in adults.
 
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As of April 28, more than 6,500 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the state of Arizona.

 
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The BIO5 Institute solicited COVID-19 research proposals for seed grants supplied by the Technology and Research Initiative Fund (TRIF).

 
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Dr. Amelia Gallitano, an associate professor in the College of Medicine – Phoenix and BIO5 faculty member, has been included in the Phoenix Business Journal's list of "Outstanding Women in Business." The publication announced this year's Outstanding Women in Business, recognizing 25 women "whose efforts around the region have drawn notice from their peers." Dr. Gallitano studies how genetics and environmental stress affect the development of illnesses such as schizophrenia and mood disorders.
 
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As the human population grows to more than 10 billion in the next 30 years, plant breeders must do everything possible to create crops that are highly productive and nutritious with minimal environmental footprints. Rice will play a critical role in meeting this demand to feed the growing population, so understanding the genetic diversity of these crops is essential. To meet this demand, Drs. David Kudrna and Rod Wing examined the genomes from representatives of 12 of 15 subpopulations of cultivated Asian rice to detect virtually all variation that exists in the pan-genome of cultivated Asian rice.